Back to overview

Wildflower Fields — Atelier, Sint-Martens-Latem, Belgium

Linen paintings

Part of the evolution: Linen I, II, III. Oil paint on brown canvas, solid oak frame

For a diverse garden, it is important to have a wide variety of plants. Our beloved wildflowers have attained their colour because they have co-evolved with their pollinators. They have adapted specific shapes and display certain colours that attracts them to their blooming flower. For example, butterflies prefer red flowers that have a platform for landing.

“Bees are attracted to pink, yellow, blue, and distinctly marked flowers, many of which reflect ultraviolet light, sometimes in a bull’s-eye pattern.” (Williams, E.H. 2005. Pg 2) Flies, which have poorer vision, prefer saucer-shaped white flowers. “Night feeding moths are attracted to heavy fragrance, but because colours are not visible at night, moth-pollinated flowers are usually pale green or white.” (Williams, E.H. 2005. Pg 2) Bats choose large, pale, and fragrant flowers while beetles go for brightly colored flowers usually with an unpleasant or carrion scented fragrance. “Hummingbirds often choose red, tubular, hanging flowers with abundant nectar.” (Williams, E.H. 2005. Pg 2)

Wildflower Fields, Linen I+II+III, Arne Quinze 2019, oil paint on brown canvas, solid oak frame

Wildflower Fields, Linen II, Arne Quinze 2019, oil paint on brown canvas, solid oak frame

Wildflower Fields, Linen III, Arne Quinze 2019, oil paint on brown canvas, solid oak frame

Natural Chaos

Amazonia — Luxembourg

“I had the most baffling experiences during some hikes through the jungle. It is nature in its...

Learn more

Distributed at a number of museums

Arne Quinze News Bulletin

Learn more

Swiss Alps solo exhibition

My Secret Garden — Gstaad

This solo show opened in February 2019, with lots of new paintings and sculptures. The Patricia...

Learn more

Go to top